Rosetta Bakery

The Juárez outlet of this much-lauded bakery is set inside an old townhouse with high ceilings, a wooden balcony and a pretty garden. Pastries and breads are made fresh daily and span conchas (sweet buns), “peasant” bread, focaccia, cinnamon rolls, bolillos (crusty rolls) and baguettes. Their coffee, said to be the best in town, is sourced from organic small-scale Mexican producers. In a city that’s still catching up with others in terms of coffee culture, this is one of your best options to linger, work, meet for lunch and then stroll around the surrounding colonia.

Lardo

On a sunny street corner in La Condesa, Italian restaurant Lardo serves up healthy breakfasts, juices, pastries and gourmet coffee. For lunch and dinner, hearty tapas such as tomato and herb-filled calamari, zucchini blossoms with ricotta and baked pasta are shared between groups of friends. Sit at the bar and watch the chefs bustle about the open kitchen, stealing glances at the dishes being prepared in front of your eyes and ordering one too many plates.

Ojo de Agua

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

  • +52 556 395 8000
  • Calle Citlaltépetl 23C
    06100

Contramar

With dedicated old-school service and pristine-white tablecloths, Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelised onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialise and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

El Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and Productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s gastronomical south.

  • Ernesto Pugibet 21

San Ángel Inn

This 17th-century hacienda has been both a monastery and a factory for pulque (a spirit made from fermented agave sap) in its former life. Its gardens, patios and ballrooms still retain a colonial feel and it’s a lovely place to stop for a tamarind margarita when you’re exploring the southern neighbourhoods. Relax in the peaceful courtyard while soaking up San Ángel’s unique charm.

  • Calle Diego Rivera No. 50
    01060

Maximo Bistrot

A firm favourite, Maximo Bistrot continues to impress with its understated yet elegant atmosphere and a menu incorporating the finest of Mexican ingredients sourced as locally as possible. Although chef Eduardo Garcia changes the menu on a daily basis, look out for lechón de confitado (suckling pig) and dishes featuring huitlacoche, an Aztec delicacy derived from a fungus found on corn (far more appetising than it sounds). Get there before the lunchtime rush to secure a table outside and watch the world go by on La Roma’s charming streets. If you’re looking for a more casual option, check out chef Garcia’s Lalo across the road and order the comte-stuffed zucchini flowers.

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colourful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks and pretty lethal.

Rosetta Bakery

Lardo

Ojo de Agua

Contramar

Parnita

El Mercado de San Juan

San Ángel Inn

Amaya

Máximo Bistrot

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