where to eat cambridge

Fitzbillies

No trip to Cambridge would be complete without standing in line to taste one of Fitzbillies’ chelsea buns. Remembered fondly by notable former students such as Stephen Fry, the buns are the product of a fiercely guarded recipe that hasn’t changed since this Cambridge institution opened its doors back in 1922. The buns are fantastically gooey, with a delicate balance of honey, cinnamon and just the right amount of raisins.

  • 01223 352500
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  • 51 - 52 Trumpington Street
    Cambridge
    CB2 1RG

Afternoon Tease

Jo Kruczynska supplied cakes to local bakers and ran a popular supper club, Platelickers Anonymous, before opening Afternoon Tease in 2015. Putting the spotlight on Cambridge’s thriving independent business scene, the café lures people in with its sweet duck-egg blue exterior and bold neon signage. It is unfailingly stocked with Kruczynska’s legendary lemon drizzle, chocolate Guinness and carrot cakes. There’s also a twice weekly-changing lunch menu as well as a weekend brunch offering that draws some serious crowds.

Aromi

Aromi is famed for its homemade gelato, available in classic Italian flavours such as hazelnut, stracciatella and mandorlato. Expect queues out the door come summer. Year-round, this authentic Sicilian café serves freshly made focaccia and flat breads, outstanding arancini and a mouthwatering selection of bite-sized pasticceria. Ingredients are imported on a weekly basis and handled according to time-honoured techniques – Aromi’s speciality dough, for example, rests for 48 hours to achieve its light texture and beautifully bubbly crust.

The Orchard

Afternoon tea at The Orchard is heavenly. It was made famous by celebrated poet Rupert Brooke and the Grantchester Group – whose members included E. M. Forster and Virginia Woolf – who took their tea in the orchard as opposed to the then customary front lawn. Today, look forward to fresh, fat scones, jam and clotted cream, followed by a snooze underneath a canopy of apples, plums and quince. Eschew public transport to get here; the two-mile walk through meadows of cow parsley and buttercups adds to the sense of bucolic bliss.

Alimentum

Outside the city centre, Alimentum is decked out with red banquettes, glossy black lacquer and a hefty dose of muzak. But stick with it. This is Michelin-starred restaurant challenges Cambridge’s surplus of over-priced restaurants serving lacklustre food. Emphasising slow cooking techniques, its menus are both seasonal and locally sourced. Classic dishes are given a modern flourish. Try the pork head with smoked ham hock, hazelnut and pineapple jam or the BBQ orange parfait with liquorice ice cream. 

Midsummer House

In a Victorian villa on the banks of the River Cam, two Michelin-starred restaurant Midsummer House is idyllic; the university’s rowing houses perch opposite cows graze nearby. Chef patron Daniel Clifford challenges the notion that food must be stiff and formal. Instead, there’s a relaxed vibe with a theatrical flourish – chefs often come to the table to finish the dish. Scallop, Granny Smith, celeriac and truffle is the restaurant’s signature dish, but don’t miss its colourful, seasonal desserts such as aerated pear, blueberry and white chocolate.

Fitzbillies

Afternoon Tease

Aromi

The Orchard

Alimentum

Midsummer House

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