Nine of the Best Places to Stay in Wales

Kitsch shepherds huts, historic hotels and cool minimalist architecture put Wales firmly on the map for UK staycations. Taking you from Snowdonia National Park to Pembrokeshire via the Brecon Beacons, these are the best places to book now.

Reckon you've done the Lake District? Ticked off foodie weekends in Cork and Galway. Gone off-grid in the Scottish Highlands and spent all your savings in bougie Cotswold farm shops? Chances are, weekends in Wales may have slipped through the net. Until now.

Thanks to the opening of stylish new hotels and innovative glamping spots heartwarming enough to counter the famous Welsh drizzle, there's never been a better time to visit. Explore Pembrokeshire's golden beaches, enjoy fine dining in Anglesey or cross paths with wild animals in the Brecon Beacons.

Cosy cabins, shepherd huts and design-driven hotels: the best boltholes to book in Wales

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Radnorshire, Stay One Degree

Powys

In the rolling Welsh hills, this design-savvy three bedroom home is a masterpiece in minimalist architecture. Beyond the slate-grey exterior, interiors are sleek and multifunctional, with three quirky bedrooms: the “library” bedroom bursting with books, the “music” bedroom has an audio system and extensive record collection, and the “bathing” bedroom provides a platform with an inset bath in which to relax. The industrial kitchen and floor-to-ceiling glass are strangely at one with grazing sheep nearby.

Address

Radnorshire, Powys

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Ty Bach Bothy

Hay-on-Wye

Top of the pile for off-grid romance, this one-bedroom bolthole is set within acres of National Trust common land, with only squirrels and otters for company. The fairy-tale cottage is kitted out with soft linen and Welsh blankets, lit by oil lamps and heated by a wood burner. Outside, there’s a freestanding claw-foot bath and hot tub immersed in the woods, as well as a kitchen garden for living out the pastoral dream for a long weekend.

Address

The Begwns, nr Hay-on-Wye

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Eirianfa

Denbighshire

A self-catering farmhouse set within 17 acres of rural land, Eirianfa wins the prize for the most difficult to pronounce address: the village is Llanbedr-dyffryn-clwyd. Once you’ve found your way here, though, you’ll have little reason to leave; the historic farmhouse has a private lake, jetty and rowing boat. The farmhouse was tastefully refurbished four years ago, welcoming the addition of a hot tub, Bose sound system, super-fast WiFi and cosy, cream AGA. Even grey days are a treat here.

Address

Llanbedr-dyffryn-clwyd, Ruthin, Denbighshire

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Fforest

Pembrokeshire

Fforest is a rural regeneration project on steroids, far cooler than any you learned about in GCSE geography, and enticing enough to tempt even the most staunch city dwellers to deepest Wales. What started out as a farm renovation by a couple of Shoreditch property developers sick of city life grew organically into a chic collection of garden cabins, holiday cottages, yurts and domes. Owners Sian Tucker and James Lynch then moved to Penbryn Beach to restore a Georgian farmhouse. The Albion in Cardigan is their newest opening. A disused warehouse in the town centre is reimagined as five self-catered apartments overlooking the canal.

Address

Cwm Plysgog SA43 2TB

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Hergest Lee

Radnorshire

A curvaceous eco-cabin designed to mirror the undulating Hanter Hill nearby. Hergest Lee was designed and built by owner Paul Gent in 2020. Taking cue from Frank Gehry, he hand-crafted much of the interiors too, marrying clean lines and modular units with mid-century finds and work by local artists. A perfect bolthole for couples. Nearby, walks to Stanner Rocks, Worsell Wood and a handful of local gastropubs are the main attraction, but we recommend seeking out wild-swimming spots too. Look up to spot red kites flying overhead.

Address

Radnorshire, Powys

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Ynyshir Tipis

Snowdonia National Park

Three newly opened tipis on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park are perhaps the least rustic camping spots you're likely to stumble upon in the Welsh countryside: think underfloor heating, king-size beds, handmade oak furniture and fluffy bath robes for when you step out of the hot tub. Each tipi sleeps two, and they can be hired as a group for gatherings with friends. On your doorstep, bird sanctuaries, coastal walks and local yoga classes await. Don't miss a visit to the Michelin-starred Ynyshir restaurant too, where chef and co-owner Gareth Ward and his partner Amelia Eiriksson celebrate fatty meats, fermentation and Wales-meets-Scandi decor.

Address

Eglwys Fach, Powys, SY20 8TA

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Penally Abbey

Pembrokeshire

An old-school Georgian hotel with a liberal dose of Gothic appeal, Penally Abbey had a flamboyant makeover during the lockdown months. The 12 seafront rooms have been refurbished with funky fabrics and wallpapers, while squishy old armchairs and antique furniture remain untouched. The hotel isn’t far from Tenby, and has views across Carmarthen Bay to Caldey Island, home of Cistercian monks. The restaurant, Rhosyn, is a destination in its own right for modern Welsh gastronomy. Afternoon tea is especially good here.

Address

Penally, Nr Tenby, Pembrokshire, SA70 7PY

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The Marram Grass

Anglesey

Come for the food, stay for the rooms. Three luxury suites ̌– fittingly named Oyster, Sea Bass and Mussels – cater to pilgrims visiting the Barrie brothers’ shining-star restaurant. Chef Ellis and brother Liam have been delighting Anglesey residents and visitors with their produce-led menus for more than a decade, showcasing their own hand-reared pork and seasonal crops from the island. Roll out of the restaurant and into the White Lodge at the entrance to the caravan park. The Anglesey Coastal Path is on your doorstep. Going all out? Book the whole place and enjoy a private dinner, with a chef guiding you through the culinary experience.

Address

White Lodge, Newborough, Anglesey, LL61 6RS

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The Hot Tub Hideaway

Brecon Beacons

Not far from the literary town of Hay-on-Wye, you’ll find an equally poetic spot for curling up with a good book and lighting a log fire. This pair of hand-crafted shepherd huts are plonked in an ancient buttercup meadow, with far-reaching views across the Welsh Borders and Brecon Beacons. There’s no mains electricity so you’ll have to put your fire-lighting skills to the test if you want an evening soak under the stars – but boy is it worth it for those unpolluted night skies. Should you fancy venturing out, the hideaways are within easy reach of a very good village pub, a Norman castle in nearby Longtown and bookshops galore in Hay-on-Wye.

Address

Hay-on-Wye, Brecon Beacons

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