Where to Drink +Dance in Cork, Ireland

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Tom Barry's

Cork , Ireland

Barrack Street is a steep incline, steeped in history. At its apex, the star-shaped Elizabeth Fort dates back to 1601. Since joining this stand-out street in 1984, Tom Barry’s has become firmly established as a Cork institution. Roaring fires, well-poured Guinness and candlelit tables make it a cosy sanctuary in the winter but the pub’s crowning glory is the beer garden. Come summer, grab a bench, order one of its delicious pizzas and hope the rain stays away. A great spot for eavesdropping on local chatter too, bask in the sing-song lilt of it all.

Address

113 Barrack Street T12 RT44

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Mutton Lane

Cork , Ireland

If you aren’t careful, you might miss the tiny lane of the same name that leads to one of Cork’s oldest pubs. Follow a mural depicting famous local residents all the way to this snug, dimly lit corner of the city. Inside, paintings and illustrations of Cork cover the walls and candles drip onto the tables. The absence of a television coupled with friendly bar staff means good conversation is encouraged (and inevitable). If you get peckish, the famous English Market is nearby – bring your purchases back to the pub, the staff don’t mind.

Address

3 Mutton Lane T12 RV07

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Mutton Lane

Cork , Ireland

If you aren’t careful, you might miss the tiny lane of the same name that leads to one of Cork’s oldest pubs. Follow a mural depicting famous local residents all the way to this snug, dimly lit corner of the city. Inside, paintings and illustrations of Cork cover the walls and candles drip onto the tables. The absence of a television coupled with friendly bar staff means good conversation is encouraged (and inevitable). If you get peckish, the famous English Market is nearby – bring your purchases back to the pub, the staff don’t mind.

Address

3 Mutton Lane T12 RV07

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Cask

Cork , Ireland

It’s only been around for a year, but Cask has already become a hotspot for the young cool crowd. The menu changes every eight weeks and drinks are based on the seasons, though the amiable mixologists will happily go off-menu if you ask nicely. The prices are higher than average for Cork, but the newly restored art-deco surroundings and inventive ice flavours (enquire nicely again) make it worth the extra few euros.

Address

48 MacCurtain Street T23 F104

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Arthur Mayne

Cork , Ireland

For something a bit different, pay a visit to this Victorian pharmacy-turned-wine bar, which backs onto the beer garden of below mentioned Crane Lane Theatre. A neon sign in the window will guide you to the door and, inside, expect vintage pharmacy cabinets, apothecary-themed cocktails and soft candlelight. Not to be missed.

Address

7 Pembroke Street T12 VR62

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Crane Lane Theatre

Cork , Ireland

“It ain’t no sin, to take off your skin and dance around in your bones”, so says Tom Waits, who sets the tone for Crane Lane, according to its owners. It’s easy to see their muse’s impact: live music seven nights a week, including burlesque, swing and up-and-coming Cork bands, four bars and a heady beer garden all kitted out in decor from the 20s, 30s and 40s. Located on the remains of an old gentleman’s club, its debaucherous feel and fine selection of craft beers make Crane Lane a hard spot to dance past.

Address

Phoenix St

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Oval

Cork , Ireland

Named after its oval ceiling, this pub is the city’s best-kept secret. Candles flicker on mismatched tables, an open fire burns all day and ghosts (allegedly) keep watch over proceedings. Order a hot whiskey and try to secure the snug at the back of the pub – a warm, cavernous seating area you won’t want to leave.

Address

25 South Main Street T12 Y15D